WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

 

PRESENTS

 

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH LECTURE

 

DR. SUSAN K. KENT

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO at BOULDER

 

“THE WOMEN’S WAR OF 1929:  GENDER AND VIOLENCE IN COLONIAL NIGERIA”

 

In late 1929, a remarkable series of demonstrations, protests, risings, and riots involving tens of thousands of Igbo and Ibibio-speaking women took place throughout southeastern Nigeria. In the course of what its perpetrators called the Women’s War, more than fifty Igbo and Ibibio women were killed by British troops and an unknown number were wounded and otherwise traumatized.  African scholars differ in their interpretations of the Women’s War, while others simply dismissed the British actions as yet another instance of the violence that has attended colonialism since the Spanish first set foot in the Americas.  They were that, to be sure, but a fuller understanding of how the “tensions of empire” played out requires the historicization of colonial violence.  I will bring together both sets of actors, analyzing their behaviors from the multiple perspectives of the war’s colonized and colonial participants, and examining the various actions of the main protagonists within in a single, gendered analytical frame.

 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012

 

2:00-3:30 PM

STEWART LIBRARY

 HETZEL-HOELLEIN ROOM

 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


 PREVIOUS LECTURES-LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED!!!

 

 The

WEBER STATE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

and the

WEBER STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI CENTER

present:

  STEPHANIE COONTZ

Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA

“The Unadulterated History of Marriage”

 Marriage has changed more in the past 35 years than the previous 3500 years.  For thousands of years, marriage was not about love and mutual respect but about property, power, and male dominance. It was only 200 years ago that love began to be central to the definition of marriage, only 100 years ago that companionship and sexual satisfaction became central, and just 40 years since we began the long march to real equality between men and women. Coontz argues that marriage has become fairer and more fulfilling than in the past, but simultaneously more optional and fragile. In this provocative gallop through the history of marriage from the Stone Age to the Internet Age, you'll learn the back story behind great love affairs of the ages such as Anthony and Cleopatra, the two most long-standing martial traditions in the world and the one surprising constant in every marriage system researchers have studied, and what's really new in love, marriage, and sexual behavior and what is not.  Dr. Coontz’s books, A STRANGE STIRRING; MARRIAGE, A HISTORY; AND THE WAY WE NEVER WERE, will be available for purchase and signing. 

 TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2011

7:00-9:00 PM

WSU Alumni Center

LECTURES ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SPONSORED BY:  College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Weber State University Alumni Association, Department of History,  Organization of American Historians

 

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH LECTURE

Presenting


Dr. Andrea Radke-Moss

Assistant Professor of History

BYU-Idaho

 

“The American Eagle in Bloomers: Women and Military Training in the American West, 1870-1900"

 

Tuesday, March 23rd, Noon

Stewart Library, Hetzel-Hoellein Room

 

Light Refreshments

 

Professor Radke-Moss, the author of Bright Epoch: Women and Coeducation in the American West,” will discuss the ways that military training at land grant colleges, allowed female students to explore one more area of traditionally male activity. As Radke-Moss demonstrates such activity not only gave women a way of challenging gender separation, but expanded their public, social and political influence in Gilded Age America.

 

This event is part of activities in celebration of women’s history month.

 

LECTURE IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

 

Sponsored by:  Women’s Studies, Stewart Library, Department of History and College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

 

 


Dr. Rachel Fuchs, Arizona State University

Distinguished Foundation Professor of History

and

President, Pacific Coast Branch – American History Association

“Mothers and Magistrates: Paternity Searches in Modern France”

The Napoleonic Civil Code of 1804 forbad paternity suits throughout the nation. Finally, more than a century later, in 1912, legislators changed the law, and permitted paternity suits. Women had to bring proof of a man’s paternity. What kind of proof did they have in an era without blood groupings and genetic testing? What the twentieth-century French magistrates permitted as proof of paternity, and the ways that women demonstrated their independence and strength in bringing paternity suits, reveals how women and men negotiated paternity. It further shows women’s relationship with the law, and the transition from the patriarchal family to the modern family of the twenty-first century. Two of Dr. Fuch’s publications on this subject will be available for sale and autograph at the lecture.